Douglas 360°

Campus events: Oct. 1-5

Don’t miss out – here’s what’s happening around campus this week!

Monday, Oct. 1

  • Student budget consultations – Oct. 1-2, 10am-1pm, at the Coquitlam Campus. Tell us your thoughts on how we should spend our money in four key areas: services, amenities, technology and physical space. And for all that hard work, we’ll even give you a chocolate bar.
  • Finance recruitment event: Envision Financial – Oct. 1, 5-7pm, New Westminster Campus, Aboriginal Gathering Space, Room S4650. Recruiters from Canadian financial institutions will be at the New Westminster Campus to hire Douglas College students and alumni.

Tuesday, Oct. 2

  • Student budget consultations – Oct. 2-3, 10am-1pm, at the New Westminster Campus. Tell us your thoughts on how we should spend our money in four key areas: services, amenities, technology and physical space. And for all that hard work, we’ll even give you a chocolate bar.
  • DSU Pride Collective Meet & Greet  – Oct. 2, 5:30-7:30pm, DSU Room 110. have some refreshments, get to know the community and meet your elected representative! Details here.

Wednesday, Oct. 3

  • Greece Field School information session – Oct. 3, 2:30pm, SFU Burnaby Campus, Hellenic Studies Seminar Room AQ6204. Find out more about the Greece Field School offered by Douglas College and SFU.
  • Sisters in Spirit Vigil – Oct. 3, 11am-2pm, Coquitlam Campus, AB Atrium. A vigil to honour and remember missing and murdered indigenous women and girls in Canada.
  • Women in Sports: Policed, Portrayed & Perceived – Oct. 3, 2:30-4pm, DSU at the New Westminster Campus, Room 207.  DSU Women’s Collective Presents Women in Sports: Policed, Portrayed & Perceived as our first discussion top for the Coffee Houses.

Thursday, Oct. 4

  • Study Abroad information session – Griffith University in Australia – Oct. 4, 10am-3pm, New Westminster Campus, Concourse.  A representative from Griffith University (Australia) will be in the New Westminster Campus concourse, Thursday Oct. 4, 10am-3pm, to talk to students about the Degree Completion program offered through Global Engagement. For more information, please contact Global Engagement Team at global@douglascollege.ca.
  • Sisters in Spirit Vigil – Oct. 3, 11am-2pm, New Westminster Campus, Concourse. A vigil to honour and remember missing and murdered indigenous women and girls in Canada.

Teaching to his own beat

Black and white image shows Music Technology instructor Kayvon Sarfehjooy bent over turntables with headphones around his neck.

By Sarah Rossi, Marketing and Communications

Lauren Hill. Nas. Trey Songz. Douglas College.

It may seem like the last one doesn’t fit in with the names of hip-hop royalty, but all four can be found on Music Technology instructor Kayvon Sarfehjooy’s extensive resumé.

The music industry vet – who has been producing for 15 years and DJ’ing for even longer  – worked with Hill for two years, doing sound design for her live shows, as well as producing songs for Nas, Lil’ Wayne and Trey Songz.

Hip-hop, Kayvon says, is the root of his passion for music.

z IMG_0107 (1)“I really got into hip-hop from breakdancing. I was a pretty good breakdancer in the second grade,” he says. At that time in the 80s, breakdancing went mainstream, to the point that it even died out for a while because it was so heavily exploited by corporations. But I stuck with the music. Hip-hop was always around me. I could relate to it and I was really drawn to it.”

Kayvon’s mother was a professional piano player and taught music. He played the trumpet and listened to jazz growing up, before making the transition to hip-hop. From there, he began to create his own music, spurring a move to New York in 2004 to grow his career as a producer with his musical partner, Beatnik, a multi-instrumentalist and a producer/audio engineer.

“We didn’t have a lot of money, and we just did it. It was tough at first, but things started happening, and we actually signed a pretty big six-figure record deal. That set it all off,” he recalls.

While Kayvon did not achieve the level of success he was hoping for, he still received money for his work and gained relationships that would carry him throughout his career.

Finally, in 2016, he made another move, to Vancouver, to teach at Douglas College. He also teaches at the prestigious Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music at New York University and the Institute of Audio Research.

The secret to success in the music world, he says, is hard work and motivation – no matter what you’re doing. While he is still teaching and mentoring students, Kayvon continues to work on his own music.

“I just make sure to keep it moving and keep working on projects. If you want your music to be heard by people, and to know that you made an impact, you have to step it up,” he says.

 

Campus events: Sept. 24-28

Don’t miss out – here’s what’s happening around campus this week!

Monday, Sept. 24

      • SHIFT: Let’s end gender violence, Sept. 24-28, at the New Westminster Campus. The week-long event will put a spotlight on the issue of gender violence and include topics such as masculinity, intimate-partner violence, legacies of colonialism and rape culture through films and discussion.  For more information and film times, see here: douglascollege.ca/shift
      • Finance Recruitment at the New Westminster Campus, Aboriginal Gathering Space, 5-7pm. Bank of Montreal will be on campus looking to hire Douglas college students and alumni. Find out more here.
      • Study abroad information session, New Westminster Campus, Concourse, 11am-3:30pm. A representative from University of California, Berkeley will be at New Westminster Campus on Monday, Sept. 24 to talk to students about the Summer Sessions program offered through Global Engagement.For more information, please contact Global Engagement Team at global@douglascollege.ca.

Wednesday, Sept. 26

      • Volunteer Fair, 10am-4pm, New Westminster Campus, Concourse. Meet and network with organizations across the Lower Mainland looking to add volunteers from Douglas College. For more information, see here.
      • r(evolve) by the 13th Story Productions, Sept. 26-28, 7pm, Anvil Centre, Loading Bay – Douglas College’s Bachelor of Performing Arts students present r(evolve), a interdisciplinary piece that utilizes movement, music, and text to explore the cyclical nature of every day life and the patterns that we all get caught in. For more, see here.

 

 

SHIFT: An interview with Kasari Govender

Image of event poster shows SHIFT in bold, bright orange, red and white. White font underneath says LET'S TALK gender violence. Registration link: douglascollege,ca/shift

By Sarah Rossi, Marketing and Communications

Douglas College will be facilitating discussions on sexual violence, intimate-partner violence, masculinity and more with SHIFT: Let’s talk gender violence Sept. 24-28 at the New Westminster Campus.

The event will engage attendees through film, dialogue and interaction with community stakeholders in a safe and inclusive space. Each night will feature a documentary that addresses themes related to gender violence and will conclude with a discussion facilitated by the filmmaker or a faculty member.

On Sept. 28, Douglas College will host a panel discussion on Violence against Women: Divisiveness, Power and Control, the Legal Landscape and the Role of Men.

Among the panelists for this discussion is Kasari Govender, executive director of West Coast LEAF – a legal organization working towards gender equality for women and for other people impacted by gender-based discrimination. Prior to the panel discussion, Govender sat down with Douglas College for an interview about the work she does with LEAF and her insights on the conversation surrounding gender violence.

Tell us about the work you do in gender violence.

Kasari 2018 torsoI am the executive director of an organization called West Coast LEAF. We are a legal organization working towards gender equality for women and for other people impacted by gender-based discrimination. Our focus is not solely around gender violence but, of course, a lot of what we do touches on issues of gendered violence.
We have a big project called “Dismantling Barriers to Reporting Sexual Assault” where we are working with stakeholders at every stage of the justice system – from first-responders to lawyers and the judges. In particular, we are working on how the credibility of women is assessed in that context and why women are not believed. Even though the facts show that it’s a myth that women make up sexual assault. For the most part, sexual assault does not have higher rates of false reports than other crimes – perhaps less.

“Only Yes Means Yes” is another project we are working on at post-secondary campuses across the province and we are now working at developing an online tool to communicate some of the legal developments and what the law has to say about consent.
Finally, as we are a legal organization, we go into the court and we work on making change through law reform and we also do public legal education. On the litigation side, we are suing the provincial government and the Legal Services Society, which is our legal-aid society, and we are arguing that they are not providing adequate legal aid for women who are facing violence in their relationships.
What are the key points that you think we need to talk about to move forward?

I think we are at an important point on the national and international stage with conversations around the #MeToo movement. And certainly part of that is simply raising awareness and dispelling myths. We have many myths as a society that infiltrate our justice system and our intimate relationships, including that women are keen to make up allegations of sexual assault, what a women’s typical reaction should be and that if women don’t report right away, then it must not have happened. And from our research, we know that is not true. Women don’t report right away often, women process trauma in many different ways, including through silence or by blaming themselves, and it doesn’t mean that what happened was consensual. So, I think that continuing those conversations and having them publicly, like we are, is an important way to dismantle some of those myths.
I tend to work less on the public conversations and more on how we change law and policy, but I do think that a culture shift is required, and these big, high-profile cases are significant.

How has the conversation changed in the last year?

I think there are a couple of different sides to it. One is that I think there has been this real rise in awareness in how common this experience is. And, even for women themselves, the story of how many times and how many women I know, when they finally did post “me too” on their social media, they said, “It took me a little while, because I haven’t really experienced it in a horrific way, and I didn’t want to usurp other people’s experience who have.” But, if what we are talking about here is sexual harassment, then of course I have experienced it, and I think we should all say that if we have.
So that realization, that we are all part of this conversation, because we all experience this kind of discrimination and forms of violence was an important piece of progress.
On the flipside, I think there has been a real backlash. This new conversation hasn’t been without its problems. I think that we are now facing the backlash of a men who say we no longer have such a thing as flirting in our society or that all men are going to be seen as criminals and so men have to be terrified in how they interact with women or asking what happened to innocent until proven guilty.
Of course in a court of law people are innocent until proven guilty, and that hasn’t changed, nor should it. But because we know that most women are harassed, we know that this is a very common experience, and many of us know men who are serial harassers, this is a way of telling the world that we don’t have to just accept that.

Are there things that make you hopeful?

Yes. Seeing powerful men being held accountable through the #MeToo movement shows that men can’t just get away with impunity and I find that hopeful. I find hopeful some of the more sophisticated conversations that I heard from people talking about gender, and gender-based violence. I’ve worked on feminist issues for my whole life to some extent, as many of us have, and I think it’s often not an issue that people talk about. People sort of consider it old news. So the recognition that this isn’t old news and that it impacts all of us on a daily basis, even in fairly progressive, developed places is a really positive development.

Volunteering perks: Elevate your resumé and support your community

Young adults of various ethnicity put their hands together over a black and white poster that says "Donate" and "Volunteer"

By Sarah Rossi, Marketing and Communications

Looking to get work experience to add on to your resumé? Don’t miss out on the Volunteer Fair Sept. 26, 10am-4pm at the New Westminster Campus in the concourse. You’ll be able to network with dozens of organizations across the Lower Mainland – all in one spot.

Read below to find out the top reasons why you should volunteer.

  • “Although each person has their own reasons for volunteering, I think the top reasons for students to volunteer is to gain experience, get to know their community and build connections. We have had many Douglas College students on our volunteer team over the years and have been impressed with their contributions.  I’m looking forward to meeting some new students at the fair.” Fay Duxbury, New Westminster Family Place

 

  • “Connect to the community outside of school – school can be an insular world and connecting to the larger community can have benefits for the future. Volunteer at an organization that is doing what you want to do – much of what you learn at school may be theoretical and organizations may have opportunities to put those theories into practice.” – Valri Wright, Coast Mental Health.

 

  • I think the top two reasons that students should volunteers are that they will contribute to society and apply what they’ve learned from school to a practical field.” – Michelle Cheong, Chinese Community Policing Centre.

 

  • “Networking: the people you meet and connections you make through volunteering is something intangible, but so valuable to grow your career. Purpose: the mission behind the volunteer work will continue to inspire you.” – Amelie Nguyen, Fraser Health

 

  • “Volunteering provides a great sense of community and allows you to see things from another person’s point of view, on a day-to-day basis, as well as their overall cultural experience. It is an excellent way to enhance your career opportunities and allows you to work with the public, while you enhance your skill set in a specific area that can lead to possible employment.” – Shelly Sarai, Burnaby Neighbourhood House

 

  • “You’ll get to meet incredible people who are passionate about what you’re passionate about and you’ll get your foot in the door – most agencies hire directly from their volunteer pool.” – Lisa Wagner, John Howard Society of the Lower Mainland

 

  • “You’ll gain experience and build connections.” – Dennis Chen, Vancouver Maritime Museum

 

  • You become involved within your community and create a positive environment for other members within your local area. This allows you to see the community come together, and you create meaningful connections with likeminded individuals. Volunteering allows you to explore areas of interests that could become your passion and even your career. If you want your passion to become your career, volunteering can help develop possible options.” – Emma Cochran, Cycling BC

 

  • “You can be a part of a team and you’ll be able to enhance community safety.” – Jen D’Souza, Surrey Crime Prevention Society

 

  • “You will develop job skills. Volunteering is the best way to gain hands-on experience for a future career. When you help an organization achieve their goals, you are also learning how to be a valuable future employee for any employer. You are showing your commitment and loyalty which employers love to see.  Volunteering also builds relationships and connections, increases skills and knowledge and increases positive attitude and social skills.  Employers are always looking for leaders to lead a company for when someone decides to retire or move on.Volunteering builds so much confidence. It teaches you the fundamentals of communicating with people in different positions, and of different cultures and ages. It teaches you how to prioritize things in life and know what it important and set future goals. It makes you a better person because you have made someone else’s life better by providing a service.” Pam Sidhu, CHIMO Community Services

 

  • “Volunteering at the Canadian Mental Health Association provides rewarding opportunities to get involved and give back to the mental-health community. Volunteers gain transferable skills to help better prepare them for employment, meet new people and gain experience in an area of interest which can include administration, event support, planning, program management, recreation therapy and education.” – Kevin Inouye, Canadian Mental Health Association

 

  • “Volunteering is an opportunity to give back to the community in a very meaningful way. It gives you the chance to help those who need it most. By being a volunteer, you will gain new skills, experiences, and relationships that can be beneficial for building your social or professional network and capabilities.” – Melissa Demeda, Canadian Red Cross

 

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to meet people from these organizations – and more – looking to add volunteers to their teams. Need help with prep? The Career Centre offers help with resume writing, interview tips and more. Check them out here.

 

 

SHIFT discussions: An interview with Simka Marshall

Image of event poster shows SHIFT in bold, bright orange, red and white. White font underneath says LET'S TALK gender violence. Registration link: douglascollege,ca/shift

Douglas College will be facilitating discussions on sexual violence, intimate-partner violence, masculinity and more with SHIFT: Let’s talk gender violence Sept. 24-28 at the New Westminster Campus.

Simka Marshall

Simka Marshall

The event will engage attendees through film, dialogue and interaction with community stakeholders in a safe and inclusive space. Each night will feature a documentary that addresses themes related to gender violence and will conclude with a discussion facilitated by the filmmaker or a faculty member.

Simka Marshall, a member of the Ahousaht First Nations and Douglas College Geography student, will be participating in in the event and providing her insight on a number of topics. The former chairperson of the B.C. Federation of Students will be facilitating discussions following the Sept. 27 screening of Luk’Luk’l, a complex portrait of five Vancouverites living on the fringes of society during the 2010 Winter Olympics.

See below for Marshall’s insight on how the conversation surrounding gender violence has shifted and what needs to be done moving forward.

Tell us about the work you do in gender violence. What brought you to this sort of work?

For the past three years, I’ve been the chairperson of the BC Federation of Students, which is a provincial student union that represents more than 130,000 students. The bulk of my work has been fighting for accessible education for students, which is important for marginalized groups. We recognize in our work that when are fighting for more affordable and accessible education and trying to make space for marginalized communities, like Indigenous people, or working towards having more women in these spaces, that we are doing work to combat gender-based violence and promote consent culture. Some of the work that we do that goes hand-in-hand with the accessible education portion is creating educational-awareness campaigns to talk about building consent culture on campus.

What are the key points that you think we need to talk about to move forward?

I definitely think that we need to recognize that everyone is at a different level of education, and that’s something that you really see regionally around British Columbia, with the amount of services that are available to folks. And I think that sometimes that could be something that we forget or that we miss. We just assume that everyone is on the same level and everyone has access to the same amount of information, but we are all really starting at different places, and I think that the best way to end gender-based violence is to take that into account.

How has the conversation changed in the last year?

I think that we are able to have a more open conversation and include more complexities, because there are so many different layers and levels to take into consideration. For example, Indigenous women are affected very differently with gender-based violence and you can link to things such as residential schools and colonialism, overall. It’s important for us to be able to explore those different layers, so people can feel like they’re being represented in this movement. And I think we are starting to see that happen a lot more now than we were a few years ago.

Are there things that make you hopeful?

Yes, absolutely. I do think we are seeing more of inclusion. And as a result, we are able to critically look at the issue of gender-based violence from the perspective of different marginalized groups and different socioeconomic classes as well. That makes me hopeful for moving forward when we are trying to develop action items.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Campus events: Sept. 17-24

Don’t miss out – here’s what’s happening around campus this week!

Monday, Sept. 17

  • Finance Recruitment at the New Westminster Campus, Aboriginal Gathering Space, 5-7pm. RBC and RBC Insurance will be on campus looking to hire Douglas college students and alumni. Find out more here.

Tuesday, Sept. 18

  • Douglas Students’ Union Clubs Day at the New Westminster Campus, Concourse, 10am-2pm. Stop by to check out the clubs on campus this year! More info.

Wednesday, Sept. 19

  • International Student Welcome at the DSU, 4:30-6pm. Learn more about the Douglas Students’ Union, meet your elected representatives and make new friends.

Thursday, Sept. 20

  • Douglas Students’ Union Clubs Day at the Coquitlam Campus, AB Atrium, 10am-2pm. Stop by to check out the clubs on campus this year! More info.

Monday, Sept. 24

  • SHIFT: Let’s talk gender violence, Sept. 24-28, various times, at the New Westminster Campus. More information here.
  • Finance Recruitment at the New Westminster Campus, Aboriginal Gathering Space, 5-7pm. Bank of Montreal will be on campus looking to hire Douglas college students and alumni. Find out more here.

Uncovering the Davis Cup myth

Photo of a red, black and white tennis racket with a yellow tennis ball on top. Set on an orange background.

By Robert J. Lake, Instructor, Sport Science 

On Aug. 16, 2018, the International Tennis Federation approved a massive overhaul of the Davis Cup, the men’s international tennis championship that dates back to 1900. A two-thirds majority among the 140 member nations approved the move to turn it from a competition involving several rounds of play throughout the calendar year into a season-ending 18-nation event. The change, which will come into effect in 2019, was made to enhance the competition’s prestige and value, and to ensure it attracts more of the world’s best

Rob Lake

Robert Lake

players, who too often skip certain Davis Cup matches to take a break and clear their timetable in what is a grueling almost 11-month schedule.

The news has brought renewed interest to the Davis Cup, but soon the International Tennis Federation will have yet another reason to check its Twitter feeds, as research findings from an article written by myself and Dr. Simon Eaves – my friend and colleague at Manchester Metropolitan University – for the Journal of Sport History will become public knowledge.

After spending a year or so gathering information about tournaments involving players of different nations that predated the Davis Cup, we came to realize that Dwight Davis, the wealthy Harvard graduate who is widely credited with coming up with the idea for the competition that bears his name almost 120 years earlier, actually played a very minor role in the competition’s incipient development.

Indeed, his involvement, beyond proffering the cup itself – a 217-ounce silver punchbowl – and paying to have it made, was negligible. But these findings go against decades of myth propagating by leading tennis officials and historians, who took Davis at his word after he repeatedly claimed that he devised the basic principle of international competition between teams of national players himself.

The story goes that, in the summer of 1899, Davis and his friends toured across America to challenge the best talent from the West Coast. On his way home, inspired by the tour’s success and the excitement generated by the upcoming America’s Cup (the international yachting event), it occurred to Davis, according to his published recollection from 1907, that “if team matches between different parts of the same country arose such great interest … would not similar international contests have even wider and far-reaching consequences?” According to Davis, “The idea came to me … that an international competition would be of the greatest possible benefit to the game throughout the whole United States and abroad.”

Upon returning to Boston, Davis met with James Dwight, president of the United States National Lawn Tennis Association (USNLTA), to present “his” idea for the International Lawn Tennis Challenge. The idea was approved and, according to Davis, “consequently I offered the International Lawn Tennis Challenge Cup.” So romantic is the story that no one would want to believe it was not true, but the fact is that his claims – which he went on to repeat in 1931 – do not stand up to scrutiny.

Simon and I discovered that competitions between teams of players representing England and Ireland took place as early as 1892, and, in 1895, between England and France. We also found  that British-U.S. relations in tennis, upon which the basis for the Davis Cup was predicated, had been developing slowly since the 1880s through the combined efforts Dwight and several leading American and British players, who embarked on transatlantic tours. By 1896, these had become a regular, annual occurrence, and in particular, the visit of Bill Larned to the British Isles that summer was significant. At the behest of Dwight and the USNLTA, Larned was on a semi-official recruiting mission, working with leading British player Harold Mahony, to secure the participation of Britain’s leading players for a series of competitions involving the best Americans the following summer. The trip in 1896 also coincided with a tournament in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont., whereupon discussions between leading figures about the possibility of a regular Great-Britain-versus-the-United-States fixture was openly discussed and written about, and it is likely there that Davis, who was in attendance, got wind of the idea.

In 1897, a reciprocal British tour to the U.S. was duly staged, and given its success, an official USNLTA-sanctioned Britain-versus-the-U.S. match was scheduled for the following summer in Chicago. The proposed event, involving six of the best from each nation, received coverage in the Chicago Tribune, but due to several of the leading American players being predisposed with work and military commitments, the idea was scrapped just months beforehand.

From this evidence, what is abundantly clear is that Davis did not devise the idea for an international team-tennis competition, nor did he devise the format – as the mix of singles and doubles had been used since 1878 in an international tournament organized by James Dwight – or contribute anything to fostering the necessary preconditions for the establishment of British-U.S. tennis relations that officially commenced in the mid-1880s. Indeed, born in 1879, Davis was still only a child when all of this was going ahead.

Childish, he was though, indeed, when he proffered a cup to Dwight in return for grandfathering him into the USNLTA executive – a move made despite the obvious conflict of interest – and then claiming, but immediately rescinding as soon as he was elected, for him to remain anonymous as donor. The wealthy, good-looking, philanthropic war hero was perfect front-man material for the event and a seemingly immaculate figure upon which American tennis officials, and the nation itself, could be proud to call their own. The only trouble is, the true details of the facts present Davis as cunning, opportunistic, conceited, power-hungry and arrogant, knowingly propagating lies and unwilling to credit the efforts of, or share the glory with, others more deserving—Dwight, Larned and Mahony for a start. The facts behind the Davis Cup myth were just as interesting for me to discover as the man himself, and just as controversial.

Perhaps before overhauling the format of the Davis Cup next year, the International Tennis Federation might want to consider overhauling the information it continues to present on its website and marketing materials, which merely propagates the lies of a man whose values might come to be perceived as antithetical to the ethos of the very competition that bears his name.

Find support through Douglas College’s counselling services

By Angela Katsamakis, Counselling Coordinator & International Counsellor

College can be a stressful and confusing time for many students. Often, this has an impact on school performance. It may be helpful to talk to someone who can assist you with managing personal challenges and easing the pressure of college life.

Counsellors, located at both New Westminster and Coquitlam campuses, are trained to provide short-term personal counselling, career counselling and support with academic petitions or appeals. You may want to visit counselling services for free support if you are having trouble in areas such as:

  • Managing personal stress
  • Relationship problems
  • Grief
  • Family related concerns
  • Anxiety or depression
  • Adjusting to college life
  • Setting career goals
  • Making career choices
  • Understanding your rights and responsibilities according to College policy

How do you make an appointment?

Simply phone or visit in-person to make a 50-minute appointment. If you are in crisis, urgent appointments are available most afternoons.

Locations and hours

New Westminster Campus, room S4600
604 527 5486
TTY: 604 527 5450
Open Monday to Friday from 8:30am-4:30pm

Coquitlam Campus, room A1050

604 777 6185
TTY: 604 777 6179
Open Monday to Friday from 8:30am-4:30pm

You aren’t alone – Counselling Services is here for you. More information is available on the Douglas College website.