Douglas 360°

Campus events: Nov. 11 – Nov. 15

Don’t miss out – here’s what’s happening around campus this week!

Kick off your week with some fun, interesting and entertaining campus events taking place in and around Douglas.

Campus Events this Week:

Monday, Nov. 11 ~ Remembrance Day

All campuses will be closed.

Tuesday, Nov. 12

  • DSU Find your chill! – 11am – 2pm in the Coquitlam atrium. Join the DSU Accessibility Collective for an afternoon of painting and other craft activities.
  • Switch Triptych: Talkback – 7:30pm in the Laura C. Muir Performing Arts Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. Travel back to New York City circa 1919 and a telephone exchange on the brink of extinction. Switch Triptych tells the story of three female operators as they grapple with gender roles, the threat of automation and the dawn unionization. Free admission for this preview show, no ticket reservation but seating is limited. Tickets are $10 for students.

Wednesday, Nov. 13

  • Aboriginal voices – 7 – 9pm in the Aboriginal Gathering Place at the New Westminster Campus. Listen to some poetry and prose from a variety of creative writers: Featuring Cassandra Blanchard, Tania Carter, and Douglas College Creative Writing Department’s Visiting Writer, Liz Howard! Hosted by Jonina Kirton. Free event with Refreshments available.
  • DSU Find your chill! – 1 – 2:30pm in the New Westminster concourse. Join the DSU Accessibility Collective for an afternoon of painting and other craft activities.
  • Switch Triptych: Matinee + Talkback – 12pm in the Laura C. Muir Performing Arts Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. Travel back to New York City circa 1919 and a telephone exchange on the brink of extinction. Switch Triptych tells the story of three female operators as they grapple with gender roles, the threat of automation and the dawn unionization. Free admission for this preview show, no ticket reservation but seating is limited. Tickets are $10 for students. There is also a 7:30pm show on this day.
  • Linkedin & personal branding workshop – 6-8pm in room 910 at the Anvil Office Tower in New Westminster. Explore the benefits of personal branding and using LinkedIn as a professional platform. Guest speaker David Keighron from the Douglas College Marketing faculty and Shannan Laing, Coordinator, Career Centre Programs, Douglas College Career Centre, alongside alumni guest speaker:  Yashasvi Grover, Grower Accountant at Oppy will be diving into how to use LinkedIn to your advantage. Free headshots will be taken for students attending, as well as free food and networking opportunities.

Thursday, Nov. 14

  • Intramurals: Badminton – 4:30–6pm in the Pinetree Community Centre near the Coquitlam Campus. Intramurals are a great way to stay active, meet new friends, build campus community and try a variety of new sports. All Coquitlam Campus intramurals are offered at the Pinetree Community Centre, next to the campus, in Gym 3. Bring your Student ID card and proof of your current class registration.
  • Switch Triptych – 7:30pm in the Laura C. Muir Performing Arts Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. Travel back to New York City circa 1919 and a telephone exchange on the brink of extinction. Switch Triptych tells the story of three female operators as they grapple with gender roles, the threat of automation and the dawn unionization. Tickets are $10 for students.
  • Q & A: Meet the experts – 4:30 – 7pm in room 910 at the Anvil Office Tower in New Westminster. Hear from business professionals about career choice and experience within their fields. Free event for students.

Friday, Nov. 15

  • Intramurals: Volleyball – 5:30–7:30pm in the New Westminster Campus at the New Westminster gymnasium, located on the first floor on the north side. Intramurals are a great way to stay active, meet new friends, build campus community and try a variety of new sports. You will need to sign-in by using the Douglas Students’ App. Download the DS App for free from the Google Play Store or the App Store.
  • Switch Triptych: Opening night – 7:30pm in the Laura C. Muir Performing Arts Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. Travel back to New York City circa 1919 and a telephone exchange on the brink of extinction. Switch Triptych tells the story of three female operators as they grapple with gender roles, the threat of automation and the dawn unionization. Tickets are $10 for students.

Ongoing Campus Events

  • Collaborative Alchemy – 10am – 7:30pm at the Amelia Douglas Gallery, New Westminster Campus. From Nov. 1 – Dec. 14, enjoy the artistic exhibit by three unique plant-based visual artists, Pierre Leichner, Phyllis Schwartz and Edward Peck, with their collection of 29 pieces of 2D and 3D visual art. Admission is always free.
  • Switch Triptych: Opening night – 7:30pm in the Laura C. Muir Performing Arts Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. Travel back to New York City circa 1919 and a telephone exchange on the brink of extinction. Switch Triptych tells the story of three female operators as they grapple with gender roles, the threat of automation and the dawn unionization. Running from Nov. 8-15. Tickets are $10 for students.
  • New Westminster Campus Fall fitness classes – Monday–Thursday from 8am–8pm and Fridays from 8am–6pm, at the Fitness Centre in the New Westminster Campus. View the scheduled classes, which range from Power Yoga to Zumba. Come get fit and healthy!
  • Coquitlam Campus Fall fitness classes – Monday–Sunday from 8am–10pm, at the Pinetree Community Centre. View the scheduled classes, which range from Pilates to Belly Dancing. Come get fit and healthy!

Check back often for more fun and entertaining campus events perfect for the Fall season!

Meet the instructor behind Douglas College’s gender-neutral washrooms

By Marie Del Cid-Luque, Marketing and Communications

Jaime Yard is on a mission to spread gender awareness across Douglas College. For starters, the Cultural Anthropology professor wants to get people to think more openly about inclusive spaces and how the world around us can play a part in promoting gender equity.

“All around us we see gendered work places, gendered family roles, gendered fields of study, and, as an anthropologist, there’s this talk about trying to pay attention to not only what people say, but also what people do,” says Jaime. “Being a person in the world, you can’t help but notice the differences between what we say about gender and what we’re actually doing and making possible on an everyday basis in everyday spaces.”

Jaime explains that as a society, we talk a big game about being inclusive and accepting of non- conventional gendered roles, however, we don’t always practise what we preach.

“We know if you’re a female going into a STEM field, for example, you’re going to find fewer people who look like you in mentorship roles and in your classes. You might face more hesitance to your ideas in group work, or more questions about your knowledge and performance because of longstanding cultural biases that encouraged more men than women to pursue STEM careers,” says Jaime. “So, thinking about gender, we confront a difference between how the world actually is and the hopeful messages saying you can be whatever you want to be. If we don’t think critically about the challenges and constraints people actually face, we aren’t setting people up to succeed.”

A gender-neutral washroom sign at Douglas College
Jaime and her students noted the lack of accessible and inclusive washroom facilities around the College.

Building inclusive spaces

Jaime says we need to start thinking more critically by asking ourselves, “what are some of the more insidious ways in which things are gendered?” This kind of thinking is what gave way for Jaime and her Anthropology of Gender and Sexuality class to begin the conversation about converting single-stall washrooms at Douglas to gender-neutral washrooms. Her class conducted a social and spatial audit of College facilities a few years ago to determine how accessible and inclusive the Campus was for non-binary and transgender students.

“One of the most basic equity issues in any work place is ensuring that people’s basic biological needs are met, and students overwhelmingly noted that the washroom facilities were inadequate,” says Jaime.

Jaime notes that gender-neutral single-stall washrooms meet a wide range of on-campus needs: for a parent with a small child who is potty training or for a diabetic student who needs a private space to administer their insulin.

“There are many different reasons why a person might need a closed space on campus. We might not have the same reasons, but it’s the same need for a space to attend to private matters,” says Jaime.

Visit the Anthropology page for more information regarding our program.

Starting a “calmversation”: how one Douglas alum is changing the face of education

On Sept. 10, 2001, Jena Sharma – known to her students as Miss Jena – started a job as an Urgent Interventionist at the Vancouver School Board, a role in which she supports schools in addressing disruptive student situations. The next day, two planes crashed into the World Trade Centre towers in New York City. It changed the way she viewed the world.

“Overnight, everything shifted,” says Jena, a graduate of the Douglas College Child and Youth Care program. “In that moment it really landed that I was responsible for the delivery of education. I couldn’t help but think about how these terrorists were once children and that there must have been something missing in schools to cause something like that to happen. But at the same time, the kids in my own school had questions, and how do you explain something you yourself don’t understand?”

A changed perspective

Jena’s changed perspective on education eventually led her to create calmversation, a compassion- and communication-driven education program for students in K-12. She felt so strongly about the program that she cashed out her pension to create it.

“calmversation was designed to help children learn how to communicate their questions, understand how they create and think, and inform their teachers of what supports and what interferes with their learning,” she says. “The lower case ‘c’ is intentional. Each letter in calmversation stands for something, and I didn’t want to give the impression that any letter or meaning is greater than another.”

Missy Jena, ready to take on the education world.

Taking a leap for education

The seeds for calmversation sprouted from Jena’s own childhood. Although she was a “smart kid,” there were many things about school that didn’t make sense to her.

“A child that experiences school without understanding why they have to do certain things will not be as engaged – and I wasn’t,” she says.

Despite being unsure about what to do after high school, Jena knew she wanted to work with kids.

“I wanted to help them learn how to express themselves and make a difference for them. Stepping into the Child and Youth Care program at Douglas became the access point for everything that has happened in my life since then,” she says. “One of the assignments we had consisted of circles that outlined how one child is connected to all these different things. It was exercises like these that really made me want to understand what we can do to support children in those formative years so they can make decisions that help them become proactive members of society, global citizens and difference makers.”   

Taking the world by storm

Since the inception of calmversation, Jena’s been taking the education world by storm. She spoke at TEDxSFU, won several Toastmasters awards and most recently, became a published author. She contributed to Voices of the 21st Century: Bold, brave and brilliant women who make a difference*[WCE3] , whichlaunched exactly 18 years after her first day at the Vancouver School Board andbecame a triple bestseller overnight.  

While her list of accomplishments is impressive, she isn’t even close to being done.

“In 2015, when I put it all on the line to create this program, I told myself I was going to focus my sights on one really big goal, and that was to make a difference in one billion children’s lives. No matter how many times I get knocked down, I will get up. I’ve got my eyes set on the Nobel Peace Prize.”

Are you an alum looking to share your story? Contact us at alumni@douglascollege.ca  

* Jena’s book will be available soon at both Coquitlam and New Westminster campus bookstores

Fall Campus events: Nov. 4 -Nov. 8

Don’t miss out – here’s what’s happening around campus this week!

Kick off your week with some fun, interesting and entertaining campus events taking place in and around Douglas.

Campus Events this Week:

Monday, Nov. 4

  • The Tragedie of Macbeth: Matinee + Talkback – 12pm in the Studio Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. Veering towards its wickedly dark side with an all-female cast, The Tragedie of Macbeth, is a wonderfully ‘wyrd’ retelling of this classic play. Matinee tickets are $10 for students.

Tuesday, Nov. 5

  • Collaborative Alchemy: Artist’s Talk – 6:30 – 7:30pm at the Amelia Douglas Gallery, New Westminster Campus. Listen to an Artist’s Talk by the three unique plant-based visual artists, Pierre Leichner, Phyllis Schwartz and Edward Peck, who will discuss their unique artwork collection that features 29 pieces of 2D and 3D visual art. This is a free event with light refreshments available!
  • DSU Advocacy Fair – 11am –2pm in the New Westminster concourse. Come out to celebrate and listen to all of the successful DSU campaigns and collectives from the past years.
  • The Tragedie of Macbeth: Talkback – 7:30pm in the Studio Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. Veering towards its wickedly dark side with an all-female cast, The Tragedie of Macbeth, is a wonderfully ‘wyrd’ retelling of this classic play. Tickets are $10 for students.

Wednesday, Nov. 6

  • The Tragedie of Macbeth – 7:30pm in the Studio Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. Veering towards its wickedly dark side with an all-female cast, The Tragedie of Macbeth, is a wonderfully ‘wyrd’ retelling of this classic play. Tickets are $10 for students.

Thursday, Nov. 7

  • Intramurals: Soccer – 4:30–6pm in the Pinetree Community Centre near the Coquitlam Campus. Intramurals are a great way to stay active, meet new friends, build campus community and try a variety of new sports. All Coquitlam Campus intramurals are offered at the Pinetree Community Centre, next to the campus, in Gym 3. Bring your Student ID card and proof of your current class registration.
  • DSU Advocacy Fair – 11am –2pm in the Coquitlam Campus atrium. Come out to celebrate and listen to all of the successful DSU campaigns and collectives from the past years.
  • The Tragedie of Macbeth – 7:30pm in the Studio Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. Veering towards its wickedly dark side with an all-female cast, The Tragedie of Macbeth, is a wonderfully ‘wyrd’ retelling of this classic play. Tickets are $10 for students.
  • Switch Triptych: Preview show – 2pm in the Laura C. Muir Performing Arts Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. Travel back to New York City circa 1919 and a telephone exchange on the brink of extinction. Switch Triptych tells the story of three female operators as they grapple with gender roles, the threat of automation and the dawn unionization. Free admission for this preview show, no ticket reservation but seating is limited.

Friday, Nov. 8

  • The Tragedie of Macbeth – 7:30pm in the Studio Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. Veering towards its wickedly dark side with an all-female cast, The Tragedie of Macbeth, is a wonderfully ‘wyrd’ retelling of this classic play. Tickets are $10 for students.
  • Switch Triptych: Opening night – 7:30pm in the Laura C. Muir Performing Arts Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. Travel back to New York City circa 1919 and a telephone exchange on the brink of extinction. Switch Triptych tells the story of three female operators as they grapple with gender roles, the threat of automation and the dawn unionization. Tickets are $10 for students.
  • Douglas College International: Green Seed Project II – 3:30 – 5:30pm in the Aboriginal Gathering Place, room S4650. Saving the planet starts with all of us, come and join others for a discussion on the UN Sustainable Development’s goals and action plan towards creating a better world for all of us. Listen to a guest speaker, engage in conversation, play games and bite into some yummy pizza!

Ongoing Campus Events

  • Collaborative Alchemy – 10am – 7:30pm at the Amelia Douglas Gallery, New Westminster Campus. From Nov. 1 – Dec. 14, enjoy the artistic exhibit by three unique plant-based visual artists, Pierre Leichner, Phyllis Schwartz and Edward Peck, with their collection of 29 pieces of 2D and 3D visual art. Admission is always free.
  • The Tragedie of Macbeth – 7:30pm in the Studio Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. An all-female cast brings one of Shakespeare’s darkest plays into the 21st century, symbolizing the end of male power. Running from Nov. 1-8. Tickets are $10 for students.
  • Switch Triptych – 7:30pm in the Laura C. Muir Performing Arts Theatre at the New Westminster Campus. Travel back to New York City circa 1919 and a telephone exchange on the brink of extinction. Switch Triptych tells the story of three female operators as they grapple with gender roles, the threat of automation and the dawn unionization. Running from Nov. 8-15. Tickets are $10 for students.
  • New Westminster Campus Fall fitness classes – Monday–Thursday from 8am–8pm and Fridays from 8am–6pm, at the Fitness Centre in the New Westminster Campus. View the scheduled classes, which range from Power Yoga to Zumba. Come get fit and healthy!
  • Coquitlam Campus Fall fitness classes – Monday–Sunday from 8am–10pm, at the Pinetree Community Centre. View the scheduled classes, which range from Pilates to Belly Dancing. Come get fit and healthy!

Check back often for more fun and entertaining campus events perfect for the Fall season!

TR grads use therapeutic recreation to help kids with disabilities improve their quality of life

By Marie Del Cid-Luque, Marketing and Communications

Giving back to the community through volunteer work led two Douglas students, Danielle Barrett and Kelsey Merritt to design an entire adaptive soccer program, get college credit for their Bachelor of Therapeutic Recreation program and to top it off, help children and youth with disabilities in a purposeful way.

“It has been an incredible experience learning new skills on how to work with people of all ages and abilities. It can get very intense at times as it is a very hands on program, but when you are passionate about something it makes it easier to put everything you have into it” Kelsey says about the TR program at Douglas.

As a result, both women became interested in volunteering with the Port Moody Soccer Club – Adaptive Soccer Program, after they saw a volunteer recruitment ad. Kelsey and Danielle have been playing soccer for 20 years, which made this opportunity a great fit. As the Adaptive Soccer program became more popular, they later became coaches, more kids started to sign up, and the program enrollment expanded through word of mouth.

Children at the Adaptive Soccer program are between the ages of 6-16. The program welcomes children of all disabilities. The specialized programming adapts to the needs of the children and is ever changing to meet the kids where they are at. “Many of these children have difficulty processing instructions and performing. We have to adapt our techniques to their individual levels and provide one-on-one support,” says Kelsey.

The Douglas spark

TR grads, Kelsey Merritt (left) and Danielle Barrett (right) both wanted to find work that was meaningful and helpful for others.

The need for this one-on-one support drove the two Douglas students to bring in more classmates to help with the adaptive program. Teri Shaw, the director of the Adaptive Soccer Program in Port Moody, reached out to the Douglas Therapeutic Recreation coordinator to see if there was a way to develop the adaptive program any further. “There is a lot of demand, but the program requires volunteers and a safe, confined space,” says Teri. It was suggested that both Kelsey and Danielle work on a project for their 4th year Management course, which includes marketing and planning. In other words, letting them present and develop an entire successful training program for the club.

“Douglas gave us the ability to design the program. This was a meaningful way to use soccer to help kids who don’t have the opportunity to play mainstream soccer,” says Danielle. “We completed a marketing plan on how to work with the community to gain participants and identify opportunities to make the program grow.”

Danielle and Kelsey continue to remain involved as coaches with the Port Moody Adaptive program while holding down jobs, Kelsey is the Program Coordinator at West Coast Kids Cancer Foundation, and Danielle is a Recreation Therapist at Enable Occupation Therapy.

“Our degrees have set us up for success and the success of the adaptive soccer program is a real testimony. There is still a lot to learn, but we are ready and capable of jumping in,” says Danielle.

Want to learn more about our Therapeutic Recreation program? Register for a free information session.

Four reasons why you should not miss Tech Week Oct. 28-30

Discover all the awesome technology available to you at Douglas College. Plus, get a chance to win a laptop, Apple AirPods and more.

At Douglas College, there are multiple technologies and services available to you. Find out all about them at Tech Week Oct. 28-30 at both campuses.

A lot of things are taking place during Tech Week 2019. Check out the event schedule to learn more!

Here are four reasons why you should not miss this event:

  1. Explore all the basic and cutting-edge educational technologies available to you at Douglas: There are 14 technology booths – Virtual Reality, 3D printing, IT support services including myAccount, password resets, and booths that will help you explore online educational resource portals like Blackboard and LinkedIn Learning. These resources provide you with a simpler, faster and more personalized educational experience.
  2. Prizes, prizes and more prizes: Register at Eventbrite for the Cybersecurity talk by Gary Perkins on Oct. 28, for a chance to win Apple AirPods! At the technology booths Oct. 29 and 30, you’ll also have a chance to win a laptop, Bookstore credit and more!
  3. Share your questions and suggestions:  Tech Week is an opportunity for you to meet with IT support services team and representatives from other College departments, such as the Registrar’s Office and Accessibility Services. This is your chance to get close to these departments and have your usual questions and concerns answered. You can also share suggestions on tools and technologies you would like to see at Douglas to enhance your learning experience.
  4. Interactive and engaging: Find out how cybersmart you are with the Cybersecurity quiz, and try your hand at 3D printing and Blackboard technologies. Every booth will have something interesting and interactive in store for you. Have we mentioned prizes?

Tech week is open for all students, employees and faculty. Participate and you will have a chance to win exciting prizes. Don’t miss out!

In his element: an alum’s journey from chemistry to clippers

By Carly Whetter, Foundation and Alumni Relations
Photos courtesy of Barber & Co.

When Jamie Stanton was earning his Chemistry diploma at Douglas College, he never thought he’d end up working in a lab at a barbershop.

“I thought I would be specializing in waste water management,” he says. “But then I realized I wanted to be in a lab and researching. I don’t think it matters if my lab is in a barber shop or if it’s in a university or if it’s in its own multi-million dollar facility. I’m still doing what I love to do,” he says.

There’ll be no mad scientist hair in this lab.

Jamie has been working at Barber & Co., an environmentally conscious barbershop in Vancouver’s Yaletown, since early this year. As the barbershop’s only chemist, Jamie is in charge of research, product development and testing.

Ultimately, he focuses on producing high quality, environmentally sustainable products – like their matte pomade and forthcoming aftershave tonic – for barbers and clients alike. “A lot of products can have toxic chemicals in them and there’s not enough consumer education on why these ingredients can be harmful. Recently, I’ve been doing a lot of research into natural preservation systems. We don’t use any perfume or any artificial scents or fragrances, only essential oils because they have medicinal benefits,” he says.

Building blocks for success

Jamie applied to Douglas College on the recommendation of a family friend and began his studies in 2009. He applied his academics to a co-op work term at ALS Environmental as a lab assistant, where he also conducted an independent research project.

Jamie, mixing up a batch of sustainable hair products.

He says the education, skills and experience he received at Douglas continue to benefit him. But mostly, it was about the people. “My education at Douglas was so valuable because I was able to form relationships with my instructors. The whole chemistry department was just fantastic and was super beneficial in forming the chemist I am today,” says Jamie.

Doing what he loves

After two years at Douglas, Jamie transferred his credits to Thompson Rivers University to complete a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. He plans to eventually pursue his PhD. Until then, he hopes to continue to grow as a chemist at Barber & Co. “This job has taught me a lot about doing what you love and what that looks like in your own life. I’ve realized that going into the lab every day isn’t work – I get to do what I want to do. Every single day is fun.” 

Are you ready for the Big One?

By Safety, Security and Risk Management

You’re working at your desk when suddenly the room begins to sway and shake. It’s an earthquake. What do you do?

On Oct. 17, in an effort to prepare for a potential earthquake, Douglas College students, employees and visitors can take part in the Great British Columbia ShakeOut – a province-wide earthquake drill – at both campuses.

“Seismic experts tell us that we can expect a major destructive earthquake in B.C.,” says Nancy Constable, Director of Safety, Security and Risk Management. “We don’t know when it might hit. This drill is about practising how to protect ourselves when it does.”

Get ready to drop, cover and hold on

On Oct. 17 at 10:17am, an announcement will inform people on campus when the drill begins. When you hear the announcement, carefully drop to the ground, take cover under a desk or table, and hold on. If you are not near a desk or table, or are physically unable to drop, cover and hold on, cover your head and neck with your arms and crouch in a corner, away from any glass. The drill will last around 90 seconds. You will be advised when it is over.

This could save your life

Constable says it’s crucial people are prepared to take the correct action in an earthquake.

“This is about how to take that immediate life-saving, injury-reducing action. In a small or moderate quake you may hear objects rattling in your office or classroom, or feel a quiver under your feet. In a large quake, the ground or floor will move – possibly violently – and you may feel dizzy and unable to walk. You will probably feel shaking and rolling,” she says. “You need to drop, cover and hold on.”

October is Cybersecurity Awareness Month: Here are 4 ways you can be cyber smart

By Shruti Ashok, Centre for Educational and Information Technology

With evolving technology comes evolving hackers. Did you know that weak passwords is the easiest way for hackers to gain access to your personal information? Did you know that 60 percent of consumers think using public Wi-Fi is riskier than using a public restroom?

Cybersecurity is a shared responsibility and it is important for us as a community, to be informed, aware and responsible, about the simple things we can do in our power to stay cyber safe and cyber smart.

Cybersecurity matters, not just on campuses, but also homes and while accessing websites and managing personal data on public networks.

4 ways you can be cyber smart

1. Passwords

Cybersecurity starts with strong password protection. Update your passwords regularly and use unique, strong and complex passwords for every account that you maintain. Don’t reuse your passwords between sites and systems.

  • Elements that make a strong password:
    • 10-20 characters
    • Combination of uppercase and lowercase letters
    • Include numbers and symbols
    • Don’t choose obvious passwords (e.g. Password, 123456 & replacements like ‘@’ instead of ‘a’)
    • Don’t choose passwords that can be found easily in the dictionary (any language)

2. Wi-Fi

Everyone loves public Wi-Fi! Hackers do, too. Open networks leave your data at risk, so in order to stay safe, only use secure Wi-Fi networks.

You should only perform financial transactions and other sensitive transactions, i.e. those that requires sharing your passwords and personal information, when you have a secured internet connection.

3. USBs

Don’t plug and play. If you see a USB device lying around on campus, do NOT plug it into your computer to see what’s on it. Turn it in to Campus Security.

Don’t use the same USB devices for home and College computers as you could run the risk of contaminating computers. If the device is malicious, it can install malware such as backdoor Trojans (a type of malware that can enable access for a remote hacker), information stealers and more.

4. Phishing

Think before you click – phishing emails are no longer just a message with bad grammar, they’re getting more and more sophisticated. Clicking on a link or opening an attachment in an email, even when it is from someone you know, can give an attacker full control of your device and passwords. Never hit “reply” if the email seems suspicious to you in any way. If you know the sender, you should check with them to make sure the link is safe.

Do not click on links embedded in emails directly. Instead, hover your mouse over it, and take a moment to check the URL address. Sometimes the link will take you to a different page with identical design and before you know it your device is already hacked.

Take the time this October to get informed about cybersecurity and be sure to follow us on Instagram, @douglascollege to participate in the upcoming password strength contest for a chance to win $500 tuition credit!

University Transfer student follows his heart all the way to UBC and his own business

By Maia Odegaard, Marketing and Communications
Photo by David Denofreo

The path to success is not always a straight line. Just ask Searaj. When he missed being accepted to SFU by a mere one percent, he enrolled at Douglas, thinking it would be a means for a quick transfer to university. However, once at Douglas, he was shocked to discover that post-secondary was much harder than he imagined.

“My first semester at Douglas was definitely the most challenging. I failed my first Chemistry course and barely passed English. I realized that post-secondary was a demanding, fast-paced environment that requires focus and dedication,” Searaj says.

If at first you don’t succeed

Rather than giving up, he took action, working with an academic advisor and instructors to get back on track. He even switched from Science to Engineering, an agonizing decision as it meant starting again almost from scratch.

Inspired by events put on by the Douglas College Business Association, Searaj had yet again, another change of heart. He realized he wanted to pursue business so, he made the switch. After completing his first- and second-year business courses, Searaj finally transferred his credits into the Business Technology Management program at UBC’s Sauder School of Business, a Bachelor of Commerce degree specialization.

Getting down to business

Searaj Alam, contemplating his next business move.

During his time at UBC, Searaj began doing marketing work for small, local companies, offering his services for free and growing his clients’ businesses through social media. Eventually, he became so overwhelmed with clients that he had to call on a few friends to help with the workload. Nowadays, he has a social media marketing business, Social Soar Canada, which is off the ground and charging rates that won’t break the bank.

“We were shocked to learn how incredibly high the average marketing rates are in Vancouver,” says Searaj. “We’re the first – and most affordable – student-driven marketing firm in the entire city.”

The Douglas difference

Looking back on his academic career, Searaj says he’s glad he wasn’t accepted to university right off the bat. “It would have cost me a lot more to learn from my mistakes there. Douglas allowed me to get my bearings, make mistakes and work to better myself,” Searaj says. “I’ve recommended to all my friends they start at Douglas.”

Find your own career path at Douglas. Book a free information session today.